Lyle and Erik high fiving each other

Prosecutor Pamela Bozanich has on at least three occasions stated that bailiffs told her that Lyle and Erik Menendez would high five each other after court.

Wikipedia defines “high five” as “A hand gesture that occurs when two people simultaneously raise one hand each, about head-high, and push, slide, or slap the flat of their palm against the flat palm of the other person…. Its meaning varies with the context of use but can include as a greeting, congratulations, or celebration.”

In the 2002 “True Crime – Lyle and Erik Menendez” documentary, Bozanich stated:
“They did a fairly good job, and I was told by the bailiffs that after court they’d go back and they’d high five each other because they’d done such a good job, you know, with their riveting testimony about sexual abuse.”

When interviewed for the 2015 “Murder Made Me Famous” documentary, Bozanich stated:
“I was told during the trial by the bailiffs that the brothers would high five each other, particularly after a good day in court when they were testifying…. They would high five each other because they pulled it off.”
(https://people.com/crime/menendez-brothers-prosecutor-pamela-bozanich-i-am-100-percent-sure-they-fabricated-the-abuse-excuse/)

In the 2017 “How It Really Happened” documentary, Bozanich stated:
“I was told by the bailiffs that he and Erik would high five each other after their testimony because they, you know, they did such a great job.”

Bozanich’s statements that the brothers would high five each other “because they did such a good/great job” and “because they pulled it off” seems to be speculation on her part, as it appears that the brothers uttered no words when they would (allegedly) high five each other. While I wouldn’t put it past the brothers to congratulate each other and celebrate having done a good job lying on the witness stand, a high five could also have been a way to cheer each other up after having gone through a grueling day of giving truthful testimony, or as a sign of feeling relief that they had gotten through a tough day in court. Make of it what you will.